Art at OzSBI

OzSBI To Host Area Art Displays with West Plains Council on the Arts

 

The West Plains Council on the Arts (WPCA) and Ozarks Small Business Incubator (OzSBI) have partnered to bring quarterly art displays to the incubator throughout 2020. Local artists’ work will be featured throughout OzSBI’s first floor.

2020

12/27/19 –  3/26/20 – Joyce Stewart

6/26/20 – 9/24/20 – Mark Wallen

9/25/20 – 12/30/20 – Nanci Harlin

2021

1/4/21 – 3/30/21 – Cindy Temple

4/1/21 – 6/30/21 – Rhonda Richter

7/1/21 – 9/30/21 – Janey Hale

10/1/21 – 12/30/21 – Kelli Albin

 

 

NANCI HARLIN

ART DISPLAY AT OZSBI TO FEATURE THE WORK OF NANCI HARLIN

OCTOBER THRU DECEMBER 2020

 

WEST PLAINS, MO – The West Plains Council on the Arts (WPCA) and Ozarks Small Business Incubator (OzSBI) have partnered to bring quarterly art displays to the incubator. Local artist Nanci Harlin’s work will be featured inside OzSBI’s first floor September 25 through end of December 2020. Visitors may view the display at the incubator during OzSBI’s business hours, anytime between 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. COVID-19 safety policies are in place.

 

“Images of our natural world come alive at the hand of Nanci Hardin,” WPCA Coordinator Janey Hale said. “Her works create for the viewer a sense of time and place in our world we don’t often get to see.”

 

A Meet-the-Artist event will be held on Thursday, October 15, from 2-4 p.m. in OzSBI’s lobby at 408 Washington Ave. in West Plains. The public is invited to attend, meet Harlin, view and discuss the pieces on display.

About the Artist

Born in the east where her love of art began, Harlin attended a Commercial art school in Boston after high school.  She eventually moved to the Midwest where she returned to school  and acquired her BS in Art Education from SMSU (now Missouri State University-Springfield).  Harlin taught art in the public school systems in Missouri and Arizona for about 17 years, in addition to serving as judge for the Arizona Federal Junior Duck Stamp Competition, President of the Colored Pencil Society-Arizona Chapter, and serving on the Museum and Cultural Advisory Board-City of Mesa, AZ.

Harlin loves drawing animals, both wild and domestic, and also does western and some Native American themes.  Her work is predominantly, but not exclusively, colored pencil. She also works in other media and has done several commission pieces. In addition, Harlin produces what is called ‘multiple originals’. These are essentially done in a numbered series.  For instance, a wolf and an eagle series of 50.   With the completion of each original requested by a client, pieces are signed and numbered like a print, i.e. 25/50.  Purchasers each receive an original piece of artwork. They are, for the most part the same but may vary slightly, to make each piece unique.

Harlin’s artwork has received many awards in Missouri, Arkansas, and Arizona art competitions. Her freelance and published works include: Logo for Arizona Draft Horse Assn.; “Cool Dip: – Defenders of Wildlife – 4 printings of Notecards; “Canadian Cruise” – Canadian Wildlife Conservation – Duck Stamp, Manitoba 2000; “Wild Born”- Black Footed Ferret Project –  Arizona Game & Fish Dept. – Prints; Cover Art – 3 years for Meadview, AZ Phone Directory; Hazelwoods – Southwest Fashion & Shirt Mfg.; and Freelance – “Print of the Year” for Furbearers Unlimited (sister organization to National Trappers Assn.)

‘My love of animals inspires me to create intimate portrayals of them,” Harlin says. “I want my viewers to sense the texture of a wolf’s fur and experience the power and intensity in the eyes of an eagle.  To create a ‘sense’ of the animal rather than a mere portrait is my goal in each piece.”

For more information about the exhibit, contact OzSBI Program Administrator Brittany Simers at brittanysimers@ozsbi.com or WPCA Coordinator Janey Hale at jhale2129@gmail.com.

 

 

MARK WALLEN

Local artist Mark Wallen’s work will be featured inside OzSBI’s first floor June 26 through September 24, 2020. Visitors may view the display at the incubator during OzSBI’s business hours, anytime between 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. All visitors are asked to follow OzSBI’s COVID-19 safety policies upon entering the incubator, including using a hand sanitation station, signing a login and practicing social distancing.

“Mark Wallen’s oil pastels create a feeling of nostalgia,” WPCA Coordinator Janey Hale said. “The images glow, causing the viewer to want to explore more deeply.”

A Meet-the-Artist event will be held on Thursday, August 13, from 2-4 p.m. in OzSBI’s lobby at 408 Washington Ave. in West Plains. The public is invited to attend, meet Wallen, view and discuss pieces on display. Guests will be asked to follow OzSBI’s COVID-19 safety policies while attending.

A virtual tour of the exhibit is available here.

About the Artist

 

A Missouri native (a few years spent in Oklahoma and Texas) currently residing in Raymondville, Mark Quentin Wallen is primarily self-taught. His studies include time working with Wendy Ziegler at Missouri State University-West Plains; he also credits the encouragement and support of the “Ventures In Art” group in West Plains. He describes his style as somewhere between Realism and Impressionism. His goal is to move closer to realism without losing the mood present in his current works.

 

Wallen’s favorite artists range from the Hudson Valley school (George Inness) to Turner, to Andrew Wyeth. He says, “Like Wyeth, I could find a lifetime of work in the 25 miles around my home.” The influence of the Impressionists’ style on the artist can be seen in his “Home from the Hunt Empty Handed.” He likes color and unlike the Impressionists, feels that drawing and color are as important as light. Turner said, “If there was any color darker than black, he would use it.” The artist would agree.

 

Most of the artist’s work is in oil pastels on paper, and oil painting on canvas and canvas board. His themes revolve around trains, old houses, buildings, and old vehicles. Most settings are rural in nature. Inspiration comes from his drives on country roads and youthful trips to his grandparents’ home in Oklahoma. His work is from memory or impressions of places. Pictures of vehicles or buildings augment his works. While the mood of the works is of abandoned places, it is not a feeling of melancholy that drives the work – rather a fondness for history. Four years of work with the Forest Service while in college influenced the artist’s view of skies and trees. Snow is also a major theme in his creations. Each work has a story in it.

“It seems that I find out what my goal is when I get there,” Wallen said. “I sometimes feel like Robert Redford’s character in ‘The Natural’ on his late start to baseball when he is told people do not start out at his age in baseball. He replies that while other things happened in life, his mind was always on the game. That’s how I feel about painting – no matter what else I had to do in life, the desire and thought of painting was always there.”

For more information about the exhibit, contact OzSBI Program Administrator Brittany Simers at brittanysimers@ozsbi.com or WPCA Coordinator Janey Hale at jhale2129@gmail.com.

JOYCE STEWART

The work of Joyce Stewart will kick off the year’s display and will be featured through March 2020. Visitors may view the display at the incubator during OzSBI’s business hours, anytime between 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.

 

“Joyce Stewart’s art gives the viewer a sense of peace,” WPCA Coordinator Janey Hale said. “Her landscape and images that center around her own life are reflective and reminds one of the simple beauty and pleasures found in everyday living.”

 

A Meet-the-Artist event will be held on Thursday, January 9, from 2-4 p.m. in OzSBI’s lobby at 408 Washington Ave. in West Plains. The public is invited to attend, meet Stewart, view and discuss pieces on display. OzSBI Executive Director Heather Fisher said having art displayed in the incubator will create a warm environment for tenants and guests.

 

“We are so excited to partner with the WPCA to feature local artists in the area,” Fisher said. “We’ve been proud to host several pieces from local artists in 2019, and their work has added a creative element to our space. Bringing the artwork of Joyce and other creators will continue to stimulate a bright and fresh work environment inside OzSBI.”

Stewart and her husband of 54 years, David, operate a cattle farm, providing inspiration for some of her paintings. Stewart says she can barely remember a time in her life that she didn’t aspire to be an artist. She drew with whatever she had, on any surface that was available (margins of schoolbooks are not a good choice). Her high school art teacher inspired her to paint and draw from life whenever possible. Through the years she experimented with many different mediums – acrylics, watercolor, pastels, oil pastel, and charcoal. Four years ago, she attended a workshop using oil paints and felt like she had finally found herself. Stewart continues to expand her skills by attending workshops with other local artists, reads art books and views original art whenever and wherever it is available. Stewart has also worked online with artists Laura Robb, Phil Starke and more. Stewart’s work has been featured in local and regional shows and is in private collections in Missouri, Arkansas and New Mexico.

“I have a driving need to create, and if I look a little distracted sometimes, it is probably because I am painting in my head, working out a solution to a painting problem, looking for the turn of a shadow on a face or just feeling the awe and the magnitude of the natural world around me,” Stewart said. “I love the feel of the paint moving across the canvas to give an impression of what I am seeing and feeling at the time. I especially like to do paintings that tell a bit of the story of the place or objects. I have always admired the work of the impressionists but tend to work in a more representational style. Becoming an artist is not a destination but a wonderful, fulfilling (and sometimes frustrating) journey!”

 

MARK WALLEN

Local artist Mark Wallen’s work will be featured inside OzSBI’s first floor June 26 through September 24, 2020. Visitors may view the display at the incubator during OzSBI’s business hours, anytime between 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. All visitors are asked to follow OzSBI’s COVID-19 safety policies upon entering the incubator, including using a hand sanitation station, signing a login and practicing social distancing.

 

“Mark Wallen’s oil pastels create a feeling of nostalgia,” WPCA Coordinator Janey Hale said. “The images glow, causing the viewer to want to explore more deeply.”

A Meet-the-Artist event will be held on Thursday, August 13, from 2-4 p.m. in OzSBI’s lobby at 408 Washington Ave. in West Plains. The public is invited to attend, meet Wallen, view and discuss pieces on display. Guests will be asked to follow OzSBI’s COVID-19 safety policies while attending.

A virtual tour of the exhibit is available here.

About the Artist

 

A Missouri native (a few years spent in Oklahoma and Texas) currently residing in Raymondville, Mark Quentin Wallen is primarily self-taught. His studies include time working with Wendy Ziegler at Missouri State University-West Plains; he also credits the encouragement and support of the “Ventures In Art” group in West Plains. He describes his style as somewhere between Realism and Impressionism. His goal is to move closer to realism without losing the mood present in his current works.

 

Wallen’s favorite artists range from the Hudson Valley school (George Inness) to Turner, to Andrew Wyeth. He says, “Like Wyeth, I could find a lifetime of work in the 25 miles around my home.” The influence of the Impressionists’ style on the artist can be seen in his “Home from the Hunt Empty Handed.” He likes color and unlike the Impressionists, feels that drawing and color are as important as light. Turner said, “If there was any color darker than black, he would use it.” The artist would agree.

 

Most of the artist’s work is in oil pastels on paper, and oil painting on canvas and canvas board. His themes revolve around trains, old houses, buildings, and old vehicles. Most settings are rural in nature. Inspiration comes from his drives on country roads and youthful trips to his grandparents’ home in Oklahoma. His work is from memory or impressions of places. Pictures of vehicles or buildings augment his works. While the mood of the works is of abandoned places, it is not a feeling of melancholy that drives the work – rather a fondness for history. Four years of work with the Forest Service while in college influenced the artist’s view of skies and trees. Snow is also a major theme in his creations. Each work has a story in it.

“It seems that I find out what my goal is when I get there,” Wallen said. “I sometimes feel like Robert Redford’s character in ‘The Natural’ on his late start to baseball when he is told people do not start out at his age in baseball. He replies that while other things happened in life, his mind was always on the game. That’s how I feel about painting – no matter what else I had to do in life, the desire and thought of painting was always there.”

For more information about the exhibit, contact OzSBI Program Administrator Brittany Simers at brittanysimers@ozsbi.com or WPCA Coordinator Janey Hale at jhale2129@gmail.com.